May 28, 2022

Canadian Firearm Rights with Tracey Wilson

Canadian Firearm Rights with Tracey Wilson

I sit down with Canadian Coalition for Firearms Rights(CCFR) Staffer Tracey Wilson to discuss the state of firearm rights in Canada, discuss the firearm amnesty Order in Council that was set to expire April 30th and talk about what the CCFR is doing to fight back against Government over reach. 

Find out more about the CCFR at https://firearmrights.ca/

Learn more about National Range Day at: Nationalrangeday.ca

I want to give a big thanks to this show's sponsor Resistance Coffee.  Follow this link to get a discount. https://resistancecoffee.com/r?id=1qhbsj
.

Support the show

Transcript

Coffee Breath Conversations:

So this episode is been released about four weeks late. Unfortunately, I had a major computer crash that wiped my whole system. Following that I went on vacation. And then when I got back, I had a personal issue that I had to deal with. That was quite urgent. So I'm getting back on track now releasing this episode, just know that there has been some developments in the firearms community since then, if you're listening, Tracy, I just want to give my apologies for releasing this episode, about four weeks later than I'd hoped to. Alright. And with that, enjoy the show. Well, welcome back to coffee breath Conversations. I'm your host Russell. And today in the studio, I have Tracey Wilson. Tracey Wilson is the Vice President of Public Relations for the Canadian Coalition for firearms rights, an accomplished Hunter, an avid sports shooter, and a registered federal lobbyist. Welcome to the show, Tracey.

Tracey Wilson:

Thanks for having me. I appreciate it.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

So I heard that you just got back from pierre poilievre's rally any green screens there?

Tracey Wilson:

No. I know, there was Twitter conversations from ex MP ex Toronto area MP, Adam Vaughn, that maybe he was photoshopping his audiences to make them appear larger. But I can confirm I am literally doing this from my car. I'm in the parking lot of the convention center. And it was packed. There was 1000s of people here. It was electric. He was on fire. And he said all the right things people just just loved it.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

Awesome. That's good to hear. It's good to know that there's a strong contender in the leadership race.

Tracey Wilson:

Yes, absolutely.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

How long? Have you been involved with the CCFR? And how did you find yourself becoming Vice President of Public Relations?

Tracey Wilson:

Well, I ve been involved with the CCFR right from its inception. So I'm one of the original founders, we were all just gun owners, members of other organizations, just people who are tired of being treated like crap by the government, and being blamed for their failure to address crime. And of course, with a Liberal government in power, we realize that gun owners needed something a little more sophisticated, a little more organized, and a little more effective. And so we founded the CCFR. And originally I, I did a lot of the original administrative type stuff memberships and organizing with clubs and things like that. I've always been interested in politics. I live here in Ottawa. I'm very well connected politically. And it was just sort of a great transition into becoming a lobbyist and becoming an official spokesperson for the Canadian firearms community.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

There's been a lot of controversy over the years about the RCMP and their ability to classify firearms. Do you think in your opinion, if it was up to the RCMP, would firearms be banned in Canada?

Tracey Wilson:

Well, I think we have to divide that are we talking about the technicians that work in the firearms lab? Are we talking about brass? Because I gotta tell you, I know a lot of the guys who work in the RCMP firearms lab, they're great guys, they're gun guys. They own some of these firearms that are banned. And they don't agree with the political decisions that are made the decisions on what and they're made by the bureaucrats. In particular, it's been Murray Smith for decades now. He has been a thorn in the side of gun owners. And he of course works at the behest of whichever government is happy to ban guns. So that's kind of a two part thing. The the guys working in the lab, the actual, you know, kind of frontline guys know, RCMP officers. No. RCMP bureaucrats. Yes. They would absolutely like to ban all guns.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

You're on Twitter and sometimes your subject of controversy with some of the lobbyists Twitter accounts for banning firearms in Canada. I think of no guns. Canada, I think is one of them. Yes. There's also the Polytechnique group as well. Yeah. Quite often they say, Why does anyone need to own a firearm? They're only designed for one purpose. And I find that quite disingenuous. I'm a Firearms Owner. I go to the range. I like target shooting. It's a great discipline and it is a discipline in order to shoot effectively you have to be disciplined. You have to be able to have patience, concentration, and it's a very hard The technical trade too, especially if you get into the old school, like muzzle loaders and things like that, there's all sorts of different areas you can get into with firearms. So why do you think they're so single minded in their purpose?

Tracey Wilson:

I mean, it's easy for them to say that because it it plays politically? Well, I mean, the average Canadian doesn't have a lot of experience with firearms. And their only experience with it either comes from Hollywood or the mainstream media, or politicians that hate guns. So it plays well, politically, but it is completely disingenuous. And it's false. I mean, guns are actually an Olympic sport, and we are represented well, on the world stage. For me, there are all kinds of legitimate lawful purposes, people and firearms in Canada, whether it's hunting, sport, shooting, collecting, I mean, these are lawful legitimate purposes. They're defined and codified in law. So anybody who says that their only purpose is to kill. I mean, if that was the case, with 2.3 million legal licensed gun owners, that would be a lot of death, and you just it doesn't equate. So I think what we need to do is we need to define, you know, have a very definitive difference between the legal legitimate use of firearms by law licensed gun owners, and the illicit use of illegally smuggled firearms by criminals. For violent purposes. They're two entirely different groups of people. Right. So yeah,

Coffee Breath Conversations:

we hear all sorts of disingenuous remarks about illegal firearms owners, and the right to own firearms in Canada. But yet, it seems like the actual sentencing for gun smugglers and people that are in possession of illegal firearms seems to be getting more and more lenient as time goes on.

Tracey Wilson:

Yeah, well, the government actually just reintroduced legislation. The listeners may remember back in the last parliament session, we had C 21, which directly attacked legal licensed gun owners with more regulation. But we also had C 22, which was a bill that would reduce the mandatory minimum penalties for a bunch of crime. Now, they've thrown in gun crimes with drug crimes. And I think there is a legitimate discussion to be had about mandatory minimum penalties for mere possession of drugs. I think the War on Drugs has been a colossal failure, a waste of money and resources, and I think people need help instead of incarceration. However, I'm not entirely sure that why that's been lumped in with some very serious firearm crimes like smuggling, discharging a firearm, there's just a whole litany of charges where they're talking about reducing the mandatory minimum penalties. So any government that is spending billions of taxpayer dollars on gun bans, using the parliamentary process to attack legal gun owners with more regulation, but at the same time, decreasing penalties, or at least removing the mandatory minimum penalties, to be softer on crime. They're not serious about reducing violence at all. And I think that's where all Canadians, regardless of how you feel about my guns, I think all Canadians can agree that if somebody is out there committing violence, and putting people's lives in danger, you know, repeatedly using illicit firearms for nefarious purposes, that that should be taken very seriously. And this government simply doesn't.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

I agree 100%, they seem more concerned about paperwork violations on legal gun owners, and then actually going after hardened gangbangers on the streets involved in in street warfare with other gang members that puts the lives of non offending Canadians at risk.

Tracey Wilson:

Oh, yeah, absolutely. And I mean, we drove around in the 2019. Election, Rod, and I spent 16 days out in a, a bus that we called the liberal failure, Boston, it's tough on gun owners soft on crime. And that's exactly how I would characterize this government. They've got all kinds of failures that we could talk about, but I'll stay in my lane, and talk about the gun stuff. And I gotta tell you, aside from being a gun owner, I'm a mother and I'm a grandmother. I want to save for community I want to save for country. And I want criminals who are running around the streets of Toronto, and Surrey, and cities all across the country. I want them to stop. I want them to be stopped and held accountable for their violent actions. We can have a conversation about what's legitimate and appropriate for civilian sporting and hunting use. But that's a different conversation than reducing crime and violence. They're not connected.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

the Harper government effectively was supposed to get rid of the registry. Yeah. And there's been instances since the registry was supposed to be gotten rid of, of members of the police forces using the registry still in their possession. High River comes into mind where this town was evacuated, and the RCMP used a list they weren't supposed to have to break and enter into people's homes to steal their legally owned firearms. And did they ever get those firearms back?

Unknown:

I believe there are still many people who never did get their firearms back. And that's pretty positive. You hear it all the time where people say, registration leads confiscation. Well, there is no other legitimate purpose for it, you can see that with this band that we've got right now. There's all kinds of firearms that have been banned in there, I think there was 505 models of firearms that were non risk previously non restricted, that are now prohibited, well, they're not registered. So they have no idea who's got what, however, they know, everybody who owned AR 15, because they're all registered. And that sort of proves me when you have data like that, that is misused and abused by a government. To me that's proof positive, that we need to never do that, again. It's an abuse of Canadian citizens who have done nothing to warrant this kind of attack.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

And the Canadian citizens that get a firearms license, aren't they held to a higher count, necessarily? Like, wouldn't you want someone who's a firearms owner to be your neighbor, because they have gone through more background checks than anyone else?

Unknown:

That's right. All Canadian firearms owners, whether they have a pile or restricted pile, have their name run through the Canadian police information system every single day. That's CPIC. Basically, what it does is it cross references, police reports with the database of firearms owners. So whether or not our guns are registered gun owners are all registered, I find as a gun owner, it almost it puts you in a different category, because little daily things that we see happen all over the place incidents of road rage, maybe get into an argument with somebody at a pub or I mean, I don't know I'm I'm old now. So none of that stuff happens to me. But you know, gun owners are held to a higher account as citizens, because we've got a lot to lose and our name is run against something. Even sexual predators are not under the same scrutiny as Canadian gun owners. And yet here we are constantly under attack by a government that is not only unwilling but unable to combat crime in any meaningful way.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

And talking about government overreach and their inability to seemingly do anything proper these days. I believe it was 2020, the Liberal government announced the ordering Council which effectively bypasses the legal, normal legislative process. Normally, from what I understand an order in council is done for small petty things that don't need to go through like appointments and small little things that shouldn't need to go through the whole process. Something like starting an order in council about amnesty, that is a huge thing. There's been no real discussion or debate in Parliament on it, they effectively used rule by decree. Today, another politician was saying that we we shouldn't be calling our government a dictatorship. But they'll use OlC's for very serious things so that they don't have to actually debate in Parliament, they don't have to show statistics, they don't have to call in experts to speak on these things. They can simply move them along. And it seems like with this OIC that's further prohibiting firearms from legal gun owners. It's just another evidence of their inability to govern by working with people.

Unknown:

That's right. So the regular parliamentary process for doing something like this would be of course, to draft legislation, to have it go through three readings in the House of Commons. It would go through votes by all members of parliament, it would go to committee where it would be studied, possibly amended. You would hear from expert witnesses who would testify to either the, you know whether it's good or bad or needs some changes. There's an entire process. And then of course, it goes through the Senate, where it goes through a very similar process. They've circumvented all of that by using an OIC so people ask me all the time, what would in a OIC normally be used for a OIC is normally used for regulatory purposes on legislation that's already passed. So an example that everyone might understand in the gun community is C-71. So we fought that long and hard 14 months through the process. However, it did pass and it received royal assent. Now, there were parts of C-71 that needed an OIC to be implemented. That bill has already been debated. It's already You know, we had our chance at the table fighting it, it's had its votes went through the parliamentary process, amendments were suggested and rejected. At the end of the day, the bill passed regardless or in spite of the work that we did. So using an OIC to implement the portions within that legislation is entirely appropriate. And that's what it's designed for. And oh, it was never meant to be used to do something of this size and scale, or even this type of measure, it avoided going to a debate or a vote, and it literally avoided democracy. So try not to be hyperbolic about saying dictator or tyrant or any of that stuff. But I mean, when you are, are abusing the parliamentary process, and circumventing democracy? Well, what do you think people are going to call you? Right? That's sort of part of the basis of our court case, our federal court challenge against this gun ban is that they failed to use the proper parliamentary procedure. Now, they could flip that OIC on its tail, put it through through legislation the proper way. And basically, we'd have no court case, we'd have to fight it in the House of Commons instead of the federal court. But it's definitely improper, and it is highly abusive of Canadian citizens.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

Just before we continue, I want to thank my shows affiliate sponsor resistance coffee. Resistance coffee is a Saskatchewan based Coffee Company, that values freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and private property ownership. They believe that fundamental freedoms are being undermined, and therefore 10% of coffee sales are donated to the Liberty coalition Canada, fight the fines and the Justice Center for constitutional freedoms. You can sip great coffee and support liberty. Coffee types include COVID-19, 84, light roast, liberal tears, medium roast, black, cold, dark roast, and more. You can buy ground or whole bean and even five pound bags, coffee is freshly roasted To order, visit them at resistance coffee.com and use discount code coffee at the checkout. And you'll be supporting my show as well. Thank you, again, resistance coffee for your support. With the OIC, let's say they did flip it on its tail. And they decided to go through the house with the new coalition government, they could almost do the same thing they're doing with the OYC right now. And they would just whip the NDP votes their way and they could get it passed anyways. Yeah,

Unknown:

they could. They could, but it takes time it takes study, you get it gets a lot of media attention. There would be House committee proceedings, those are televised, you know, so a lot of stuff would come out. And in the end, I think it would give us a great opportunity to show Canadians how this is incredibly wasteful and ineffective. And the resources would be better allocated towards root causes or at risk youth initiatives or, you know, there's a variety, a litany of things that I could name off that that would be better suited to actual public safety measures, just to avoid all that. That's why they did it this way. And yeah, you're right. At the end of the day, would they have the votes? They would, but I'm not sure they would have the public support, because we would have the opportunity to speak to it. We would be interviewing on it like crazy, like during C-71. I think between rod and I we did over 200 interviews. So it would really be an eye opener for the public. And I think if Canadians understood that they're going to waste billions of their tax dollars chasing around hunters and sport shooters, while reducing sentencing for some very serious crimes by gang members. I don't think they'd have the support of the public. So I think that's why they've refrained from using the proper procedure.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

With the amnesty sort of portion of the OYC. From what I understand they actually couldn't find a tender that would be willing or able to, to actually go to people's homes to seize people's firearms.

Tracey Wilson:

Yeah, that's right. So they put out a tender, there was a consultant firm that they had spoken to. And this was actually just sort of come up with a plan, right? Not to actually execute it. But just to design it. Of course, that was publicized. The company received a lot of blowback on it, I don't think they fully understood what it was that they were about to bid on. There was a lot of outcry from the community. So that company backed off, then they engaged with IBM to put together they spent a couple of million dollars actually with IBM, putting together sort of a plan or a study on how to do it and what the problems would be. And to be honest with you and it didn't really come out with any valuable information. Just recently, they actually extended the amnesty, we were served them notice that we were filing an injunction in the federal court to extend the amnesty because of course, it would run out at the end of April. And gun owners would become criminals overnight. We knew they were going to extend it, but we were going to force their hand at it. So they did extend it for another 18 months, which is great. It's not a definitive win. It's not an end to this battle. But I was worried that they would extend it, like six months, you know, enough time for them to get their ducks in order, but not enough time for us to finish a court battle. So by them extending it a year and a half. It's truly a gift to us. So yeah, our legal team is quite happy with that. And the court case is full steam ahead

Coffee Breath Conversations:

with the CCF are like I used to be a member of I'm trying to remember the name of I think it was called the CCSA at one point. Yeah. Yeah, I used to be a member of with them years ago when I first became a Firearms Owner. But then after a while, I didn't feel that I was really getting much representation. So I didn't I didn't renew with them. So with the CCFR, what does it mean to get a membership with the CCFR as a firearms owner? What benefits do I get out of that?

Unknown:

Well, the most important benefit and really, at the end of the day, this kind of makes it all worth it is every single member a membership is $40 for an entire year. And every single member of the CCFR enjoys the protection of a $5 million personal liability insurance policy. So people always ask me, Well, what's that mean? What does it insure me for? Well, that is insures you during any legal sports, shooting, hunting, fishing, anything activity, where you're using firearms, or even a fishing rod. So let's say you and I go shooting out in the back 40. And, you know, we're unloading a gun, and we accidentally leave one in the chamber, and we have a negligent discharge, you injure somebody, or you damage someone's property, you know, maybe around goes through a barn or whatever, and you get sued. Well, you're protected for up to $5 million. You know, when I think about what $40 means, times are tough. And these are really tough times through this pandemic, and the inflation and all the things going on. So I recognize $40 isn't nothing, but at the same time, basically a box of ammo, right, that also gives you the satisfaction of knowing that you're doing your part, to invest in the organization, that out front fighting for you every day, we are the only organization to file their own federal court challenge against the gun ban. We have the largest case our our case is the lead case. We also have the only registered lobbyist in Ottawa. I mean, here I am, I'm literally doing this interview. From my car after a political event. I'm boots to the ground all across the country chasing these guys around. We have all kinds of public relations and public awareness, things that we do. We are third party political advertisers in every election, we hold a seat on the mass casualty Commission, which of course, the public inquiry into the Nova Scotia shooting, just to you know, ensure that the interests of gun owners are protected during these things because, of course, that's what the gun ban was born out of, you know, we have a national TV show. This is our third national TV show, where we're bringing updates information resources to Canadian gun owners. We also have done debate.ca, which is sort of our sister website, and that is chock full of resources for gun owners. There's an entire series of two minute explainer videos. These are great little tools in your social media or online debates, stead of trying to come up with witty comebacks or type out you know, these long paragraphs, you can drop this two minute video and every single one of them is a mic drop, you know, I could go on if you go on the website and go hit the Why join button. There's a list there of the stuff that we do. And I don't know you're gonna need pretty much the evening to go through it and see all the amazing crazy stuff we do. We also are the only national organization with a women's program. And that was born out of the idea that number one, it the stats show us that women vote. In fact, they come out in droves. And I don't need every Canadian female to be a gun owner, although that would be really cool. But I need them to stop supporting bad liberal policy that starts by taking soccer moms and everyday average Canadian women who otherwise wouldn't have the opportunity taking them out to the range. Every single gun owner knows that the very best way to influence somebody's ideas about guns or gun ownership is to take into the range. You can talk and debate and watch videos and do all the things that we all do. But the very best way is to say, hey, take an afternoon and come to the range with me and try it for yourself. I have never had anybody that walked away saying I hate that, ever. So that's, that's vitally important. So we've, we've got that going on with the ladies Range Days, we've hosted over 4000 women across the country that continues on that's solely funded by the women of the CFR in our our fundraising calendar. We also are trying a new PR stunt that has absolutely no CC fr branding on it. And that is national range day. And we are taking the first Saturday in June, every year, this year at falls on June 4. And we are making it national range day. And that's the day to celebrate the 2.3 million licensed legal gun owners who participates safely and responsibly in the shooting sports in this country that was born out of an idea talking to rod about this country has everything from national poutine day to National Donut Day like there's all kinds of crazy days. I said, Well, why don't we have a national gun owner day and Rod said, Well, we've we're waiting around for the government to give us a day where they're never going to do it. So what we're going to do is we're going to take it, and that's what we've done. So you can go to national range day.ca All kinds of resources there. There's videos, you can share logos there that you're free to use. We're encouraging ranges gun owners,

Tracey Wilson:

Wildlife Federation's other firearms organizations, and just everyday gun owners to take somebody's shooting, I did the math, there's 2.3 million licensed gun owners in Canada, in a country of a population of 37 million. If every single one of us to 16 people to the range. That's all of Canada. So I think we can do it, I really do think we can do it. And we're going to we're going to start June 4, and every year this event is going to grow and grow. And as you know, 10 or 20 years from now we'll look back, and not really remember how it started, we'll just remember that it's our special day as a community. And that's the idea.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

I think that's a great idea, Tracey, my friend can attest from personal experience, and possibly he may even be tuning in because he often listens to my show. To get the other side of the story. I brought a friend who is very liberal, I wouldn't say it was against firearm ownership, but was confused by it to the range and shot with him. And we shot a variety of different firearms. And I went through all the safety procedures. And I explained to him all the different licensing requirements and that, and although he told me he would never own a firearm personally, he came out I think, with a much different opinion afterwards after personally, engaging in sport shooting himself.

Tracey Wilson:

Yeah, I think people sort of get this weird idea. We do live beside the most gun saturated country in the world. And the news coming out of America can seem a little wild west sometimes. And then of course, you've got the influence of Hollywood, Hollywood and these action movies and media reports and politicians. And the whole idea of gun ownership sort of gets this warped American eyes, sort of fear mongering boogeyman stuff. And I think dispelling that by taking somebody to the range, we have very strict transport and storage rules. We follow very strict protocols at all our licensed gun ranges, you know, there's always a safety table and there's maximum rounds allowed per firearm and once they see all that they have a different understanding, a greater understanding and a greater respect for what it takes to be a Canadian gun owner. And it's, it's not easy. There's a lot of rules. There's a lot of stuff that we go through. But at the end of the day, it is Canada's greatest sport. And it's I love it because it is the most inclusive. I'm an older woman, you know, I'm middle aged, I'm 50 years old. I'm a grandma and I can go to the range and compete with a 20 year old guy. It doesn't matter what gender you are, what age you are. There's guys in my league in wheelchairs, there are no barriers. The only barrier to firearms sports is your attitudes or your mindset on gun ownership. In this country. We talk a lot about being inclusive and having gender neutral, this and inclusivity that there isn't a sport that is more inclusive than firearms. Everyone can participate and everyone can do well.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

I agree 100% Tracey. It's so nice to see that there's a sport that can really help bridge the gap for some people.

Tracey Wilson:

Well if you look at tam at the last Olympics, our shooting team, I believe was was all women. That's pretty amazing. My good friend Linda Keiko is on the Canadian national team. She has been to numerous Olympics. Her father was an Olympian, she holds a seat on the Canadian firearms Advisory Committee. She's a wonderful mom of three little kids and an engineer. They like to paint us as some sort of rednecks or something like that. And granted, been a little known to be a little redneck, myself bumps on camp for sure. But it's also made of all kinds of people from all kinds of walks of life. I also have done some events with the pink pistols group in Toronto, and it's diverse, it's dynamic, it's inclusive. It's fun, it's very exciting. Shooting a gun is is empowering and exciting. And with a little bit of practice, you can get really good at it. That is fine. It doesn't matter how many hours I throw on a pair of skates and try and go out on the ice. I am not going to compete with my grandson's hockey team. That's kind of where we're at. I think it is the greatest sport this country has to offer. I hope more Canadians, give it a try. And hopefully national rains day will encourage

Coffee Breath Conversations:

you are kind of the face of firearms for a lot of people in Canada. So you have to withstand a lot of kind of slings and arrows thrown your way personal attacks. I mean, I've been on Twitter spaces that you've been on. And the second that you go to speak, it seems like there's always a couple of people that if it's a very public space that are just up there going for the attack the ad hominem attacks on sort of things. How do you deal with that on a near daily basis?

Tracey Wilson:

Well, I think at the beginning, there was there would be some really awful stuff. People tell me things like hope your kids shoot you in the face, or I don't know if it was no guns in Canada. One of them said, you know, hopefully your your teenage daughter doesn't get shot at an ice cream shop. Like some weird things like that. Oh my God, that's terrible slept on my windshield. Somebody left a note on my windshield and put a gun slept on it. Like I have had some really bizarre stuff. And, and for me, it's weird. Just because I'm a gun owner. I literally live in the suburbs. I'm a grandma, I have a Wawa. You know, I take care of my elderly mother. I was an essential caregiver to my father, at the veterans home before he passed last November. I'm a military mom, we're a military family. We're good salt of the earth people. It's funny, just because I advocate for legal gunowners I get all this wild stuff thrown at me. It used to sort of get to me, I just let it roll right off my back. Now it literally means nothing to me. And I do recognize there's a huge difference between real life and the online life. Nobody out there would ever have the balls to say any of that stuff to my face. But everywhere I go, I'm well received, well spoken and articulate. I'm educated. And I'm passionate about what I do. And at the end of the day, it's not just about saving our guns, although it's exactly about that. But it's also about holding this government to account for their failure to address crime. I know that I've got being right on my side. When I look at all the people flinging garbage at me online or flinging garbage at rod, I look at it. That's their tactic. That's what they've got what I've thought is the truth. And the truth is, is taking my guns or taking your guns, or taking any of our legal guns and putting more regulation on people already following the law and not committing the violence isn't going to solve our crime problem. These people are meaningless. And the majority of them actually have no real voice in the actual debate. The online Twitter debate isn't real life. The real debate is in the halls of Parliament, the offices on Wellington Street here in Ottawa, these are the people that that it matters to the conversations that we have. And those of course, are nothing like the Twitter battles.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

What can firearms owners be doing right now besides signing up for the CCFR? What could firearms owners be doing right now that could be making a difference?

Tracey Wilson:

Yeah, so it's really important to reach out to your MP regardless of political affiliation, let them know, you know, just say, Hey, I'm in your constituency. I am a licensed gun owner. And, you know, you can voice your opposition peacefully to the Liberals mandate on guns, but at the same time, ask them what they're going to do to have credible public safety measures, right? Real measures that are going to address crime and violence. And the other thing you can do is reach out to Marco Mendocino. Since He, of course, is the Minister for Public Safety and all members of parliament, their email addresses follow the same format. So it's first name, dot last name@parl.gc.ca. I emailed them all the time. The more they hear from us, the more it's on their radar. Silence is taken as acceptance. If you don't support or you don't accept the Liberals idea of just focusing on legal gun owners letting gangbangers run the streets of Toronto shooting everything up. If you don't say anything, they think you accept it. It is vitally important to do that. Comment on their social media, email, their office call their constituency offices. That's a great thing tie up their staff on the phone. This is important. Like if they don't hear from us, they think okay, well, this stuff's just gonna go through all those who all I'm hearing from is Tracey Wilson. I don't think donors really oppose this stuff. That's the way they think it is important. You don't have to write an entire chapter. Even if you just want to string two or three sentences together, do it politely. But yeah, even if you just have a record of your opposition, it does wonders, we need to do more of that.

Coffee Breath Conversations:

Again, I really want to thank you for coming onto the show today. It's nice to hear someone that is educated on the subject that knows what they're talking about that is passionate about the advocacy. If people want to hear more, if people want to find out more, where can they go? Who can they contact?

Tracey Wilson:

Okay, so you can find us at firearmrights.ca. That's our main website. Of course, if you're interested in helping support Canadian gun owners, you can go to nationalrangeday.ca That's the website for for our annual day that we're planning. You can find me on Twitter at at p Wilson Ottawa. Warning it is a little spicy on there. And of course follow the CFR on all our social media. We've actually just sort of enlisted some help with that, because I do all the social media for me and for the CCF bar, and it's a lot we've got a little bit of help coming our way on that. I am terrible on Instagram. So that look for that to improve shortly. You can find us all over. We also have our TV show CCFR our radio on the air airs weekly on wild TV. It's a sort of a weekly update for gun owners and we ever podcast can be found on the CCFR our YouTube channel. And that's the CCFR radio

Tracey Wilson CCFR Profile Photo

Tracey Wilson CCFR

Tracey Wilson is the Vice President of Public Relations for the Canadian Coalition for Firearm Rights, an accomplished hunter, avid sport shooter and a registered federal lobbyist. The CCFR is your voice in Ottawa, advocating for fair and effective public safety policy, while defending the interests of licensed firearms owners. As a passionate advocate for youth and women in our sport, she embraces the new shooter and encourages education and awareness. She brings with her a tenacious spirit, political influence and experience navigating the legislative process.